Tony Gatlif

Films in our catalogue

SWING

Max, an only child, is 10 years old. He loves Manouche jazz, a music he discovered the first time he heard the guitar virtuoso Miraldo play. This music becomes his passion and brings him to the town's Manouche neighbourhood, where he buys an old guitar. Max (...)

Exiles

As extravagant as it may sound, Zano one day comes up to his lover Naïma and suggests that they both set out for Algiers : why don’t they cross France and Spain to eventually reach Algeria and discover the land their parents had to flee decades ago ? (...)

TRANSYLVANIA

Zingarina arrives in Transylvania, in the heart of Romania, looking for the man she loves. She had met him in France, but one day he left without a word of explanation. With her friend Marie, who jealously watches over her, Zingarina throws her body and (...)

Children of the stork

Otto and Louna meet every morning in the train to Paris. Otto is unemployed and hawks a street newspaper for the homeless. Louna works in a hairdresser's salon and lives in the apartment of an old woman threatened with eviction. But both are fed up with a (...)

Vengo

Caco, an Andalusian, can't get over the death of his daughter. He drowns his grief in musical revelries in the company of his young nephew, Diego, whose physical handicap is no obstacle to his passion for wild times, women and Flamenco. The place is (...)

Biography

Tony Gatlif's dual ancestry has served as a rich source of inspiration for his work as an artist. Born in 1948 in Algeria to Gypsy parents of Spanish descent, Michel Dahamani (known as Tony Gatlif) was later educated at L'Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Despite taking residence in France, Gatlif returns time and time again to his true origin - the Gypsy community - in a passionate quest for self-examination. From his second feature film, La Terre au Ventre (1978), which references the Algerian war, to Les Princes (1982), an uncompromising description of gypsies who have settled in a soulless suburb, Gatlif‚s early works focused on the unromantic reality of Gypsy life. His later works, including the much acclaimed Latcho Drom (1993) and Gadjo Dilo (1997), are vivid songs of joy celebrating Romany culture with a focus on the vibrant traditional music which breaths life into the Gypsy people.